Organizational Behavior

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Organizational behavior (OB) is defined as the systematic study and application of knowledge about how individuals and groups act within the organizations where they work. As you will see throughout this book, definitions are important. They are important because they tell us what something is as well as what it is not. For example, we will not be addressing childhood development in this course—that concept is often covered in psychology—but we might draw on research about twins raised apart to understand whether job attitudes are affected by genetics. OB draws from other disciplines to create a unique field. As you read this book, you will most likely recognize OB’s roots in other disciplines. For example, when we review topics such as personality and motivation, we will again review studies from the field of psychology. The topic of team processes relies heavily on the field of sociology. In the chapter relating to decision making, you will come under the influence of economics. When we study power and influence in organizations, we borrow heavily from political sciences. Even medical science contributes to the field of organizational behavior, particularly to the study of stress and its effects on individuals.

Course Description[edit]

A study of individual and group behavior from a managerial perspective. Attention is focused on managerial applications of theory and research about the interaction between people and the formal organization, with emphasis on individual differences, interpersonal relations, and small group dynamics.[1]

Index[edit]

Chapter 1[edit]

Systematic study
Evidence-based Management (EBM)
Intuition
Intuition2
Psychology
Social Psychology
Sociology
Anthropology
Contingency variables
Workforce diversity
Ethical dilemmas
Ethical choices
Levels of Organizational Behavior (Unit of analysis)

Chapter 2[edit]

Age Discrimination
Biographical characteristics
Cognitively efficient
deep-level diversity
Disability Discrimination
discrimination
Discriminatory Policies or Practices
Diversity
Diversity management
Exclusion
Gender Discrimination
Incivility
Intimidation
Mockery and Insults
Physical abilities
Racial and Ethnic Discrimination
Sexual Harassment
stereotype
surface-level diversity
workplace diversity

Chapter 3[edit]

Attitudes
Cognitive Component
Affective Component
Behavioral Component
Cognitive Dissonance
Job satisfaction
Job involvement
Psychological empowerment
Organizational commitment
Perceived organizational support
Employee engagement
Citizenship Behavior
Exit-voice-loyalty-neglect framework(EVLN)

Chapter 4[edit]

Affect
Emotion
Mood
Six Universal Emotions (Emotion Continuum)
Display Rules
Positivity Offset
Moral Emotions
Personality
Affect Intensity
Affective events theory (AET)
Emotional Labor
Emotional Dissonance
Felt Emotions
Displayed Emotions
Surface Acting
Deep Acting
Emotional Intelligence
Emotional Regulation
Emotional Contagion
Deviant Workplace Behaviors

Chapter 5[edit]

Personality
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)
Big 5 Personality Model
Machiavellianism
Narcissism
Psychopathy
Core Self-Evaluation (CSE)
Self-Monitoring
Proactive Personality
Situation Strength Framework
Situation Strength Theory
Holland’s hexagon
Person-Organization Fit
Person-Group Fit
Person-Supervisor Fit
Values
Hofstede Dimensions
GLOBE Framework

Chapter 6[edit]

Anchoring Bias
Attribution Theory
Availability Bias
Bounded Rationality
Confirmation Bias
Contrast Effect
Escalation of Commitment
Formal Regulations
Fundamental Attribution Error
Halo Effect
Hindsight Bias
Historic Precedents
Justice
Overconfidence Bias
Perceiver Factors
Perceiver Factors II
Perception
Performance Evaluations
Person Perception
Randomness Error
Rational Decision Making
Reward Systems
Rights
Risk Aversion
Selective Perception
Self-imposed Time Constraints
Self-serving Bias
Situation Factors
Target Factors
Utilitarianism

Chapter 7[edit]

Motivation
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Theory
McGregor's X-Y Theory
Two-Factor Theory
McClelland's Theory of Needs
Intrinsic Motivation
Extrinsic Motivation
Self-Determination Theory
Goal-Setting Theory
Management by Objectives (MBO)
Self Efficacy Theory
The Pygmalion Effect
Equity Theory
Expectancy Theory
Job Engagement Theory

Chapter 8[edit]

Job Characteristics Model
Job Rotation
Job Enrichment
Flextime
Job Sharing
Telecommuting
Internal Equity
External Equity
Variable-Pay Program
Piece-rate Pay
Merit-based pay
Bonuses
Skill-based pay
Profit-sharing Plans
Gainsharing
Employee Stock Ownership Plan
Flexible Benefits
Employee Recognition Programs

Chapter 9[edit]

Group
Social Identity Theory
The Five-Stage Model
Punctuated Equilibrium Model
Group Roles
Group Norms
Conformity
Reference Groups
Group Status
Group Size
Social Loafing
Ringelmann Experiment
Group Cohesiveness
Group Diversity
Groupthink
Groupshift
Interacting Groups
Brainstorming
Nominal Group Technique (NGT)

Chapter 10[edit]

Teams
Work Group
Work Team
Problem-solving Teams
Self-managed Teams
Cross-functional Teams
Virtual Teams
Team Context
Team Composition
Team Process
Team Efficacy
Team Cohesion
Social Loafing

Chapter 11[edit]

The Communication Process
Formal Communication
Informal Communication
Direction of Communication
Downward Communication
Upward Communication
Lateral Communication
Oral Communication
Written Communication
Nonverbal Communication
5 Ways to Listen Better
Channel Richness
Persuasive Communication
Automatic Processing
Controlled Processing
Filtering
Information Overload
Communication Apprehension
High-Context Culture
Low-Context Culture

Chapter 12[edit]

Leadership
Manager
Leader
Traits Theory
University of Michigan Studies
Fiedler Leadership Model
Situational Leadership Theory (SLT)
Path-gaol Theory
Charismatic Leadership Theory
Vision
Transactional Leaders
Transformational Leaders
Full Range of Leadership Model
Authentic Leaders
Socialized Charismatic Leadership
Servant Leadership
Trust
Mentor
Attribution Theory of Leadership

Chapter 13[edit]

Power
Dependence
Political Skill
Formal Power
Reward Power
Legitimate Power
Expert Power
Referent Power
Power Tactics
Nine Influence Tactics
Legitimacy
Rational persuasion
Inspirational appeals
Consultation
Exchange
Personal appeals
Ingratiation
Pressure
Coalitions
Upward Influence
Downward Influence
Lateral Influence
Political Behavior
Defensive Behavior
Impression Management

Chapter 14[edit]

Conflict
Traditional View
Interactionist View
Value of Conflict
Functional Conflict
Dysfunctional Conflict
Task Conflict
Relationship conflict
Process Conflict
Desired Conflict Levels
Dyadic Conflict
Intragroup Conflict
Intergroup Conflict
The Conflict Process
Negotiation
Distributive Bargaining
Integrative Bargaining
Bargaining Strategies
The Negotiation Process
Best Alternative to a Negotiation Agreement (BATNA)

Chapter 15[edit]

Chapter 16[edit]

Culture
Seven Senses of Culture
Organizational Culture
Weak Culture
Strong Culture
Formalization
Institutionalization
Barriers to Change
Barriers to Diversity
Barriers to Acquisitions and Mergers
Socialization

Chapter 17[edit]